Hearing loss is common and can affect a child’s ability to develop speech, language, and social skills. The earlier children with hearing loss start getting services, the more likely they are to reach their full potential.

What is Hearing Loss?

A hearing loss can happen when any part of the ear is not working in the usual way. This includes the outer ear, middle ear, inner ear, hearing (acoustic) nerve, and auditory system.

Signs and Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of hearing loss are different for each child. If you think that your child might have hearing loss, ask your child’s doctor for a hearing screening as soon as possible.

Screening and Diagnosis

Babies

All babies should have a hearing screening no later than one month of age. Most babies have their hearing screened while still in the hospital. If a baby does not pass a hearing screening, it is essential to get a full hearing test as soon as possible, but no later than three months of age.

Children

Children should have their hearing tested before they enter school or any time there is a concern about the child’s hearing. Children who do not pass the hearing screening need to get a full hearing test as soon as possible.

Adapted from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

For more information about the Community Hearing Health Collaborative and to refer a patient or family, contact us at