Cancer Prevention

Cancer Prevention

Featured Articles

Place as a Risk Factor: How Geography Shapes Where Cancer Strikes

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

While we have always heard that “your genes dictate how long you will live,” or “your choices, like smoking or obesity, cause cancer,” where you live is also very important to your chance of developing, dying from, or surviving cancer.

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Ailing Man

Cancer May Soon Become Leading Killer of Americans

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

Heart disease might soon relinquish its long reign as the number one killer of Americans to another scourge, cancer – if long-term mortality trends continue.

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Letter From the Editors

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

Luckily, cancer in the pediatric population is a relatively rare phenomenon as compared to the much more common malignancies of middle and older age. In addition, for a variety of reasons, most of these malignancies tend to be more manageable, and the overall cure rate of pediatric cancer now approaches 80 percent.

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Dr. William and Dr. Martin Murphy

Conquer Cancer Foundation: Taking Down Cancer Before it Even Begins

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

The most troubling cancer diagnoses are often those doctors cannot explain: when otherwise healthy, low-risk people find themselves as unlikely cancer patients.

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Obesity, Liver Disease and Cancer: A Deadly Mix

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

As obesity rates rise, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is driving a rise in liver cancers.

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Dr. Anna Meadows

Spotlight On: Dr. Anna Meadows

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

When cancer strikes any child, the first goal is a cure.

And yet treatments used to fight pediatric cancers – powerful chemotherapies and radiation – can sometimes come with side effects, including an increased risk for secondary cancers years later.

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Dr. Alfred Knudson

Cancer Research Pioneer Dr. Alfred Knudson Dies at 93

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

It’s perhaps tough to imagine, but decades ago scientists had little inkling that parents might pass down abnormal DNA that upped the odds for a particular cancer in their child. Or that cells might have mechanisms to help defend themselves against these aberrant, cancer-linked genes.

That all changed when Alfred Knudson, MD, PhD, decided in the late 1960s to investigate what are now known as heritable cancers.

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Is ‘Big Soda' On the Run? Taxes on Sugary Drinks Make Headway

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

One of the least publicized – and for health advocates, most welcome – outcomes of the 2016 U.S. election was the passage in numerous cities of legislation supporting taxes on sugary sodas.

Seven U.S. urban centers have already enacted such measures to help curb obesity.

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Patient ‘Navigators’ Boost Cancer Screening in Hard-to-Reach Groups

Issue 29, Summer/Fall 2017

In study, program staffers successfully contacted and guided patients who’d previously faced roadblocks to testing.

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