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Return to Larger Waistline Is Linked to Increased Risk for Heart Disease in Women Overview

More on Larger Waistline Is Linked to Increased Risk for Heart Disease in Women

Larger Waistline Is Linked to Increased Risk for Heart Disease in Women

NEW YORK (Jan 19, 2006)

Women with waistlines of 35 inches or more are at greater risk of heart disease than thinner women, according to a new study by researchers at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia and Sister to Sister: Everyone Has a Heart Foundation. The study is published in today's Journal of Women's Health.

Of more than 6,000 women without known heart disease whose waistlines were measured on Women's Heart Day, February 18, 2005, the study found that 90 percent had at least one major risk factor for heart disease, and one-third had three or more. These risk factors included high cholesterol and high blood pressure, among others. Increased waist circumference was also correlated with a woman's 10-year chance of having a heart attack or dying of heart disease.

"Measuring waist circumference may be a simple method that women can identify themselves as being at increased heart-attack risk and empower them to seek further evaluation and possible treatment from their doctors," says lead author Dr. Lori Mosca, director of preventive cardiology at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and professor of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

A substantial proportion of women screened were found to have major risk factors for heart disease they were unaware of. Nearly half of all women with elevated cholesterol or low HDL cholesterol ("good" cholesterol) did not report a history of being told they had abnormal cholesterol from a health-care provider. Alarmingly, 43 percent of women who participated in the screening had blood glucose above what is considered normal (< 100 mg/dL). And, 16 percent of women with no documented history of hypertension had elevated blood pressure (> 140/90 mmHg) that should receive intervention based on national standards.

According to Dr. Mosca, who also serves as the chief medical advisor for the Sister to Sister: Everyone Has a Heart Foundation, "These findings underscore the need to educate women about their personal risk of cardiovascular disease and educate them that where there is one risk factor present, there are likely more. Lifestyle is critical in treating the risk factors for heart-disease-related conditions like hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes that are associated with abdominal obesity and each other. Weight management, good nutrition, regular exercise, and avoidance of smoking can go a long way to lowering overall cardiovascular risk. Because so many participants in our screening program were unaware of their risk, our study makes clear that women need to ask their physician if they have any of these risk factors."

Sister to Sister: Everyone Has a Heart Foundation, Inc. is a not-for-profit grassroots organization founded in 2000 by Mrs. Irene Pollin with a mission to bring free heart-disease screenings and "heart-healthy" prevention information and support to women nationwide. Since its inception, Sister to Sister has touched the lives of thousands of women through the National Woman's Heart Day® Campaign. So far, nearly 20,000 women of all ages, races, and socioeconomic backgrounds have been screened for cardiovascular disease risk factors.

"We now know that these screenings provide an additional and unforeseen benefit," says Mrs. Pollin. "Not only have they allowed us to identify and educate women at risk, but they have provided a rich opportunity for research that will be useful in educating the millions of women who may not be able to attend the screenings in person but are at risk of heart disease."

National Woman's Heart Day health fairs will take place in 14 U.S. cities on Friday, February 17, 2006.

Co-authors of the study include Dana Edelman, M.P.H., Heidi Mochari, M.P.H., R.D., Allison H. Christian, Ed.D., Furcy Paultre, Ph.D., and Irene Pollin, M.S.W.

The study was sponsored by NewYork-Presbyterian and the Sister to Sister: Everyone Has a Heart Foundation.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital – based in New York City – is the largest not-for-profit, non-sectarian hospital in the country, with 2,344 beds. It provides state-of-the-art inpatient, ambulatory, and preventive care in all areas of medicine at five major centers: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian, The Allen Pavilion, and The Westchester Division. One of the largest and most comprehensive health-care institutions in the world, the Hospital is committed to excellence in patient care, research, education, and community service. It consistently ranks as one of the top hospitals in the country in U.S.News & World Report's guide to "America's Best Hospitals," in New York magazine's Best Doctors issue, in Solucient's top 15 major teaching hospitals, and in many other leading surveys. The Hospital has academic affiliations with two of the country's leading medical colleges: Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University and Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons.

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